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Chamomile

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Herbal Alternative Health

Chamomile

The medicinal herb Chamomile as an alternative herbal remedy - Two types of chamomile are used for health conditions: German chamomile and Roman chamomile. While the two kinds are thought to have similar effects on the body, the German variety is more commonly used in the United States and is the focus of this fact sheet.Common Names--chamomile, German chamomile

Latin Names--Matricaria recutita, Chamomilla recutita Picture of Chamomile

  • German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) was traditionally used to help relieve occasional simple nervous tension. This herb helps to gently soothe and lessen frustration caused by common everyday overwork and fatigue. Active ingredients include volatile oil, flavonoids, valerianic acid, coumarins, tannins, salicylates and cyanogenic glycosides.

What Chamomile Is Used For

  • Chamomile has been widely used in children and adults for thousands of years for a variety of health conditions.
  • The herb is often used for sleeplessness; anxiety; and gastrointestinal conditions such as upset stomach, gas, and diarrhea.
  • It is used topically for skin conditions and for mouth ulcers resulting from cancer treatment.

How Chamomile Is Used

The flowering tops of the chamomile plant are used to make teas, liquid extracts, capsules, or tablets. The herb can also be applied to the skin as a cream or an ointment, or used as a mouth rinse.

Herbal Remedy Products with Chamomile as one of the active ingredients

  • Chamomile has been widely used in children and adults for thousands of years for a variety of health conditions.
  • The herb is often used for sleeplessness; anxiety; and gastrointestinal conditions such as upset stomach, gas, and diarrhea.
  • It is used topically for skin conditions and for mouth ulcers resulting from cancer treatment.

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  • Serenite Jr™ - Herbal remedy to promote healthy sleep patterns for restful nights & refreshed mornings
    • Promotes healthy sleep patterns in children and babies
    • Helps settle occasional nighttime restlessness and fussiness
    • Promotes healthy, restful sleep
    • Helps manage common teething-related sleep disturbances
    • Non-addictive and easy-to-administer
    • Gentle enough for babies 6 months and older

Focus Formula.jpg
  • Focus Formula™ - Herbal supplement for mental focus
    • Promotes concentration and healthy attention spans to stay on task
    • Supports brain functions including concentration, information processing & memory
    • Encourages normal energy levels and helps maintain a balanced mood

BioVent Drops.jpg
  • BioVent Drops™ - Natural remedy reduces asthmatic symptoms and improves respiratory function
    • Improves respiratory functioning
    • Reduces frequency and severity of asthma attacks
    • Reduces allergic reactions
    • Ensures strong immune system functioning
    • Reduces stress-related asthma and respiratory problems
    • Relaxes bronchioles and prevents bronchospasms

What the Science Says about Chamomile

  • Chamomile has not been well studied in people so there is little evidence to support its use for any condition.
  • Some early studies point to chamomile's possible benefits for mouth ulcers and certain skin conditions. In combination with other herbs, it may be of some benefit for upset stomach and for diarrhea in children.
  • NCCAM-funded research on chamomile includes studies of the herb for generalized anxiety disorder and for chronic pain caused by children's bowel disorders.

Side Effects and Cautions about Chamomile

  • There are reports of rare allergic reactions in people who have eaten or come into contact with chamomile products. Reactions include skin rashes, throat swelling, shortness of breath, and anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reaction).
  • People are more likely to experience allergic reactions to chamomile if they are allergic to related plants in the daisy family, which includes ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, and daisies.
  • Tell your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This helps to ensure coordinated and safe care.

News About Chamomile

Sip On Chamomile Tea to Reap Health Benefits: From Reduced Stress, Better Digestion to Smooth Skin

(NDTV Food Desk)
Chamomile tea may help soothe digestion, tackle stomach ache.
Highlights
1. Chamomile is also known as Babune ka phal in India
2. It is known to reduce stress and anxiety
3. Chamomile can easily be consumed in the form of tea

Alternatively known as Babune ka phal, although chamomile is native to Australia, it is fast picking up on popularity here in India. Its soothing flavour and miraculous health benefiting properties are something that is making it a hit among health and fitness enthusiasts. Chamomile extracts are also used in a variety of products ranging from skin and beauty-care products to teas and tisanes. Grappling with extra workload? Or too stressed to take some time off? A cupful of chamomile tea will not only boost digestion but also help tackle stress and anxiety. Here are more reasons for you to sip on this health drink:

Sleep Better

According to a Delhi-based nutritionist and wellness expert, Anshul Jaibharat, chamomile can help you sleep better. You can have it like your daily cup of green tea without worrying about caffeine.

Boost immunity

Regular consumption of chamomile tea may help boost your immunity and prevent harmful infections, bacterial invasions and common cold, cough and flu. Chamomile fruit also comes laced with anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties.

Pain management

Chamomile tea may help soothe digestion, tackle stomach ache as well as menstrual cramps and pain. "Chamomile tea has been valued as a digestive relaxant and has been used to treat various gastrointestinal disturbances including flatulence, indigestion, diarrhea, anorexia, motion sickness, nausea and vomiting," notes National Centre for Biotechnology Information.

Beauty care

From combating sunburn, reducing acne, lightening skin and tackling dandruff, chamomile is excellent for personal care. Either sip on its goodness every day or let the brew cool down and apply on the affected area to experience the difference. Used chamomile tea-bags can be put on eyes to treat puffiness and dark circles.

Stress and anxiety

Harvard's health blog states, "Chamomile, also known by the botanical name Matricaria recutita, is one example. It is well known to many of us who drink tea, not only for its delicious taste but also as an alternative treatment for anxiety. In a clinical trial, chamomile extract was found to reduce anxiety when compared with placebo."


Chamomile Tea, the Life Extender?

By Nathan Collins

A new study finds lower mortality rates among Hispanic women who drink chamomile tea as an herbal remedy.

Few doubt the power of tea, forever revered as a calming salve on a rough day. Legend has it a box of Bigelow Mint Medley herbal tea once kept tent-bound climbers sane during a particularly nasty Denali storm. Chamomile tea can supposedly even add streaks to your hair.

But there's more: According a study published earlier this year in The Gerontologist, chamomile tea is associated with a decreased risk of death in Mexican-American women aged 65 or older.

That might sound like an oddly specific result, but Bret Howrey and his colleagues at the University of Texas Medical Branch weren't crazy for investigating it. Some herbs have well-documented health value, and chamomile in particular may help fight inflammation and lower cholesterol, to name just two medicinal benefits. Meanwhile, according to a 2007 National Institutes of Health survey, around 18 percent of Americans use natural remedies of some kind, and studies show that chamomile is a common treatment in Mexico for colitis, dyspepsia, and other gastrointestinal ailments.

The researchers estimate that Hispanic women over 65 who drank chamomile as a home remedy died at rates 28 percent lower than others.

Those potential benefits led Howrey and his team to wonder whether drinking chamomile tea might lead to longer lives. To find out, they gathered data on 1,677 people who took part in the "Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly" research series. Among many other things, that research tracked which herbal remedies participants used, as well as if (and when) those participants had died.

Remarkably, drinking chamomile tea was associated with a roughly 30 percent drop in mortality rates—though only for women. Adjusting for demographic factors such as age and education, health factors including high blood pressure and diabetes, and even financial strain, the researchers estimate that Hispanic women over 65 who drank chamomile as a home remedy died at rates 28 percent lower than others. There was no statistically discernible effect for Hispanic men over 65.

That's not to say everyone should rush out and buy chamomile tea. The study only looked at older Hispanic men and women, aged 79.5 on average, and the researchers had no information on how much or how often anyone drank tea. The nature of the statistical analysis almost means that chamomile tea is only associated with a lower risk of dying, not that drinking the daisy-based tea actually helped save lives. "It is possible that other unmeasured factors, such as frequency and duration of chamomile, level of physical activity and quality of diet, which were not measured in the survey, could influence the results," Howrey and his colleagues write.

On the other hand, chamomile has been used as an herbal therapy for centuries, and recent studies suggest its value is more than a superstition or old wives' tale. So go ahead, give in to the power of the tea—if nothing else, it'll keep you hydrated.


Can You Use Chamomile Tea to Treat Acid Reflux?

By Annette McDermott (Medically Reviewed by Deborah Weatherspoon, PhD, MSN, CRNA, COI)

Chamomile tea and acid reflux

Highlights

1. There isn’t any scientific evidence to confirm whether chamomile can help acid reflux. 2. One study found that an herbal mix with chamomile extract lowered gastric acidity as well as a commercial antacid. 3. Most people can drink chamomile tea without having any side effects.

Sweet-smelling chamomile is a member of the Asteraceae family. This plant family also includes daisies, sunflowers, and chrysanthemums. Chamomile flowers are used to make teas and extracts.

Chamomile tea is known for reducing anxiety and helping people fall sleep. It’s also used to calm an upset stomach and other digestive issues. Despite chamomile’s reputation for taming tummy troubles, there’s no scientific evidence to prove that it helps acid reflux.

What are the benefits of chamomile tea?
Pros
• Drinking a cup of chamomile tea can offer the same benefits as taking an aspirin or ibuprofen.
• Chamomile can ease symptoms of anxiety and depression.
• Chamomile has anticancer properties.

Chamomile has long been recognized as an anti-inflammatory. Drinking a cup of chamomile tea may offer the same benefits as taking an over-the-counter NSAID, such as aspirin.

The herb may also relieve symptoms of anxiety and depression. A 2009 study found that people who took daily doses of chamomile extract experienced up to a 50 percent reduction in symptoms of anxiety. A study published in 2012 found that a daily chamomile supplement relieved symptoms of depression.

Chamomile can also help treat digestive issues, such as irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea, and colic.

Chamomile also has anticancer properties. Apigenin is one of the herb’s primary active components. It has been found to inhibit cancer cell growth and reduce the blood supply to cancerous tumors.

Early studies suggest chamomile may also benefit mouth ulcers caused by chemotherapy or radiation. Recent studies also show that chamomile has the ability to lower blood sugar.

Research on chamomile and acid reflux

In-vitro and animal studies have shown that chamomile has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial capabilities. Acid reflux causes stomach acid to move backwards into your esophagus. This often leads to painful inflammation in the esophagus. It’s possible that chamomile’s anti-inflammatory effects may help.

According to a 2006 review of studies, an herbal preparation that included chamomile extract lowered gastric acidity as well as a commercial antacid. The preparation was also more effective than antacids at preventing secondary hyperacidity. However, chamomile wasn’t the only herb in the preparation. More study is needed to determine if it would have the same impact on its own.

Stress is a common acid reflux trigger. A 2015 study reviewed the prevalence of lifestyle factors associated with gastroesophageal disease (GERD). GERD is a more severe form of acid reflux.

Study participants reported “feelings of continued stress” as the number one factor that made their symptoms worse. In theory, drinking chamomile tea may help reduce stress. So it may also help reduce or prevent stress-related acid reflux episodes.

Risks and warnings
Cons
• Chamomile tea can amplify the effects of anticoagulant medications.
• An allergic reaction to the herb is possible, especially if you’re allergic to other plants in the daisy family.
• Long-term effects of herbal teas aren’t yet known.

Most people can drink chamomile tea without experiencing any adverse side effects. Some people have reported an allergic reaction after coming into contact with chamomile.

You may be more likely to have an allergic reaction if you’re allergic to other plants in the Asteraceae family.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction can include:

• skin rash
• throat swelling
• shortness of breath

In extreme cases, anaphylaxis may occur. If you start having any unusual symptoms, you should seek immediate medical attention.

You shouldn’t drink chamomile tea if you’re taking anticoagulant medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin). The herb contains natural blood-thinning compounds that may exacerbate the effects of these medications.

If you’re pregnant or breast-feeding, you shouldn’t use chamomile without your doctor’s approval.

Other treatments for acid reflux

You should see your doctor if your symptoms of acid reflux continue. They may recommend one of several over-the-counter remedies:

• Antacids can help neutralize stomach acid.
• Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can help reduce the amount of acid your stomach produces.
• H2 receptor blockers prevent your stomach from making acid.

Prescription-strength PPIs may be prescribed if over-the-counter versions don’t work.

Prokinetic prescription drugs are used to empty your stomach faster than normal. The less time that food stays in your stomach, the less chance there is for acid reflux to occur. Prokinetics may have serious side effects. This includes nausea, vomiting, and delayed or abnormal movement.

If medication isn’t enough to control your symptoms, your doctor may recommend a surgical procedure called fundoplication. During the procedure, the top of your stomach is sewn to the lower part of your esophagus. This helps reinforce the lower esophageal sphincter and decreases acid reflux.

What you can do now

Research suggests that chamomile tea may help relieve acid reflux symptoms caused by inflammation or stress. Still, there isn’t any medical research at this time to determine whether chamomile tea directly impacts symptoms of acid reflux.

If you decide to try chamomile tea, remember:

• Most people can enjoy chamomile tea with little risk of side effects.
• Chamomile may cause drowsiness. You shouldn’t drive until you know how it affects you.
• If your symptoms worsen or you experience anything unusual, you shouldn’t drink any more tea until you’ve met with your doctor.
• You can purchase pre-made chamomile tea bags or prepare them your own.

5 Ways Chamomile Tea Benefits Your Health

By Brianna Elliott (RD)

Chamomile tea is a popular beverage that also offers a variety of health benefits.

Chamomile is an herb that comes from the daisy-like flowers of the Asteraceae plant family. It has been consumed for centuries as a natural remedy for several health conditions.

To make chamomile tea, the flowers are dried and then infused into hot water.

Many people enjoy chamomile tea as a caffeine-free alternative to black or green tea and for its earthy, somewhat sweet taste.

Furthermore, chamomile tea is loaded with antioxidants that may play a role in lowering your risk of several diseases, including heart disease and cancer.

Chamomile has properties that may aid sleep and digestion, as well.

This article will discuss 5 potential health benefits of drinking chamomile tea.

1. May Improve Sleep Quality

Chamomile has some unique properties that may benefit the quality of your sleep.

It contains apigenin, an antioxidant that binds to certain receptors in your brain that may promote sleepiness and reduce insomnia, or the chronic inability to sleep (1, 2).

In one study, postpartum women who drank chamomile tea for two weeks reported better sleep quality compared to a group that did not drink chamomile tea. They also had fewer symptoms of depression, which is often linked with sleeping problems.

Another study found that people who consumed 270 mg of chamomile extract twice daily for 28 days had 1/3 less night time awakening and fell asleep 15 minutes faster than those who did not consume the extract.

These findings are promising, but more studies are necessary to determine the extent of chamomile tea’s effects on sleep. Nevertheless, drinking chamomile tea before bed is certainly worth a try if you have trouble falling or staying asleep.

Summary:
Chamomile contains antioxidants that may promote sleepiness, and drinking chamomile tea has been shown to improve overall sleep quality.

2. May Promote Digestive Health

Proper digestion is extremely important for your overall health.

A small amount of animal research suggests chamomile may be effective for promoting better digestion by reducing the risk of certain gastrointestinal conditions.

A few studies have found that chamomile extract has the potential to protect against diarrhea in mice. This is attributed to its anti-inflammatory properties (5, 6).

Another study in rats found chamomile to be helpful in preventing stomach ulcers, as it may reduce acidity in the stomach and inhibit the growth of bacteria that contribute to ulcer development.

Despite these findings, more human research is needed to confirm chamomile’s role in digestion.

Nevertheless, there are many anecdotal claims that drinking chamomile tea is soothing to the stomach. Traditionally, it has been used to treat several digestive ailments, including nausea and gas.

Summary:
Chamomile tea may protect against diarrhea, stomach ulcers, nausea and gas, likely due to its anti-inflammatory effects.


3. May Protect Against Certain Types of Cancer

The antioxidants found in chamomile tea have been linked with a lower incidence of certain types of cancer.

Chamomile contains the antioxidant apigenin. In test-tube studies, apigenin has been shown to fight cancer cells, especially those of the breast, digestive tract, skin, prostate and uterus.

Additionally, one study of 537 people observed that those who drank chamomile tea 2–6 times per week were significantly less likely to develop thyroid cancer than those who did not drink chamomile tea.

These findings are promising, but more high-quality, human research is necessary to make a conclusion regarding chamomile tea’s role in cancer prevention.

Summary:
Chamomile tea contains the antioxidant apigenin, which may help lower inflammation and reduce the risk of several types of cancer.

4. May Benefit Blood Sugar Control

Drinking chamomile tea may aid in lowering blood sugar levels.

Its anti-inflammatory properties may prevent damage to the cells of your pancreas, which occurs when your blood sugar levels are chronically elevated.

The health of your pancreas is extremely important, as it produces insulin, the hormone responsible for removing sugar from your blood .

In one study of 64 diabetic people, those who consumed chamomile tea daily with meals for eight weeks had significantly lower average blood sugar levels than those who consumed water (12).

Additionally, several animal studies suggest that chamomile tea may lower fasting blood sugar levels by a considerable amount, and it may also be beneficial for preventing blood sugar spikes after eating (13, 14, 15).

Most of the evidence regarding chamomile tea’s role in controlling blood sugar is based on results from non-human studies. Nevertheless, the findings are promising, as blood sugar control is an important factor in reducing the risk of diabetes.

Summary:
The anti-inflammatory effects of chamomile tea may promote blood sugar control, especially when it’s consumed with a meal.

5. May Improve Heart Health

Chamomile tea is abundant in flavones, a type of antioxidant.

Flavones have been studied for their potential to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, which are important markers of your heart disease risk (17, 18).

One study of 64 diabetic patients found that those who drank chamomile tea with meals had noteworthy improvements in their total cholesterol, triglyceride and “bad” LDL cholesterol levels, compared to those who drank water.

More research is necessary to confirm chamomile tea’s role in promoting heart health, but it certainly couldn’t hurt to include it in your diet.

Summary:
Chamomile is a great source of flavone antioxidants that may play a role in improving heart health.
Other Potential Health Benefits

The following health benefits of chamomile tea are mostly anecdotal and not supported by scientific research:

• Boosts immune health: Chamomile tea is often promoted as a strategy for preventing and treating the common cold, but evidence for this is lacking. It has also been said to be soothing for sore throats.
• Relieves anxiety and depression: There is some evidence that chamomile may reduce the severity of anxiety and depression, but this is mostly based on using it as an aromatherapy or taking it as a supplement.
• Improves skin health: It has been reported that applying chamomile to the skin via cosmetic products, such as lotions, eye creams and soaps, may be moisturizing and helpful for reducing skin inflammation.
• Prevents bone loss: Some claim that chamomile tea may play a role in preventing bone loss that leads to conditions like osteoporosis. However, evidence for this is weak (1).

Although these health claims lack evidence, that does not mean they are false. They simply have not been studied yet and may be in the future.

Summary:
There is currently no strong evidence that drinking chamomile tea improves immune, bone and skin health. Additionally, research regarding its role in anxiety and depression is lacking.
Adverse Effects of Chamomile Tea

Drinking chamomile tea is generally safe for most people.

There have been reports of chamomile allergies, which are most likely to occur in individuals who are allergic to plants in the Asteraceae family, such as ragweed and chrysanthemums.

Furthermore, cosmetic products that contain chamomile may be irritating to the eyes if they make direct contact with them. This may lead to conjunctivitis, which is inflammation of the lining of your eye.

It is also important to note that the safety of drinking chamomile tea has not been established in young children, pregnant or nursing women and people with liver or kidney disease.

Nevertheless, there have not been any reports of life-threatening adverse reactions or toxicity from drinking chamomile tea.

Summary:
Although a few people may be allergic to chamomile, it is safe for most people to drink. Negative side effects are extremely rare.
The Bottom Line

Chamomile tea is a healthy beverage.

It is rich in some powerful antioxidants that may have a variety of health benefits, including reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Although the research relating to chamomile tea is promising, there have simply not been enough studies to make a conclusion about its effects on health.

Many of the studies relating to chamomile tea have been conducted in animals and test tubes, and the results cannot be translated to humans.

Nevertheless, chamomile is very safe to drink, and many people enjoy drinking it for its delicious taste and comforting aroma.

If you want to explore chamomile tea’s potential benefits, it is definitely worth including in your diet.



Chamomile’s calming properties may be real

(Environmental Nutrition, The Detroit News)

There’s nothing quite like a cup of hot chamomile tea to soothe frayed nerves. In fact, dried chamomile flowers (Matricaria recutita) were used as far back as Roman times for their calming effects. Today, an increasing number of studies indicate there may be some true relaxing benefits in a fragrant cup of chamomile tea.

Chamomile’s effect on mental state: What’s the magic relaxing ingredient in chamomile? A yellow compound called apigenin, one of the chamomile’s phenolic flavonoids, appears to be the most promising component. A study published in the May 2005 issue of the Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin looked at this ingredient and linked it with sleep- and tranquility-enhancing effects.

A study funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and published in the August 2009 issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology reviewed the effects of chamomile in patients diagnosed with mild to moderate generalized anxiety disorder. The 57 participants received either chamomile capsules containing 220 mg of extract standardized with 1.2 percent apigenin, or placebo, a chamomile-scented capsule with lactose. Judged against placebo, chamomile was associated with a greater reduction in standardized test scores for severe anxiety. Further, an exploratory study that found a significant reduction in standardized scores of depression for chamomile versus placebo was published in the September-October 2012 issue of Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine.

The bottom line: Will your next cup of chamomile tea release you from anxiety?

Although conventional drug therapies for depression and anxiety have helped many, lots of people don’t care to try these medications for many reasons, including potential side effects and cultural or financial concerns.

Thus, chamomile may be a promising “natural” calming agent to add to your pantry.

However, while evidence shows that the bioactive ingredients in Matricaria recutita have the capability to calm you down, whether there are enough of these phytochemicals in one or two tea bags is still to be determined. More rigorous testing of chamomile remedies needs to take place so that we fully understand its efficacy, as well as the dosage that will be beneficial.

Still, you surely can’t minimize the mental health power of taking a few moments for yourself while sitting down and sipping the warm grassy flavors of a cup of chamomile tea.



Could camomile tea help women live longer?

By Saffron Alexander

A new study has revealed the secret to a longer life may be a simple cup of camomile tea

Camomile tea has long been used to combat illnesses and ailments, but new research suggests that drinking the tea may help women live longer, too.

Researchers from the University of Texas published a study in The Gerontologist suggesting that drinking camomile tea is linked to a lower risk of early death in women.

• The health benefits of different teas

The study analysed data taken from the 'Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly' of 1677 Mexican-American men and women over a seven year period. Researches looked at the effects of camomile tea and the cause of death.

They found that drinking camomile tea lowered the risk of death among women by 29 per cent. Researchers made adjustments for demographics, health conditions and health behaviours and still found the link was still present.

They also found that drinking camomile tea had no effect on the mortality rate of men.

• How to always get served at the bar

One of the authors, Bret Howrey, said: "The reason for a difference in our reported findings between Hispanic women and men is not clear, although women were shown to be more frequent users of chamomile than men.

"This difference may be due to traditional gender roles whereby women manage the day-to-day activities of the household, including family health, and may also reflect greater reliance on folk remedies such as herbs."

This isn't the first time camomile has been linked with health benefits. In 2008 scientists claimed drinking camomile tea could help keep diabetes under control.

The study, which was done on rats, found the amount of sugar in their blood fell by a quarter after drinking camomile tea for three weeks.


Chamomile Tea and Lower Blood Sugar?

(World Tea News)

Researchers from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in Iran have released the results of a small scale study, linking chamomile consumption to lower blood sugar.

The study, published in Nutrition, involved 64 people with diabetes between the ages of 30 and 60. For two months, half of the group was given water following each meal, while the remaining participants were to drink chamomile tea (3 grams of tea per 150 mL of hot water). The men and women in the study were asked to provide information about dietary habits and body measurements and blood tests were taken.

At the end of the eight week period, blood tests confirmed that those who consumed chamomile had lower blood sugar and their antioxidant levels were higher. Specifically, insulin levels and “glycosylated hemoglobin” (hemoglobin in the blood to which glucose is bound) were reduced, as well as a compound that indicates oxidative stress in diabetic patients.

The key factor in chamomile is a particular antioxidant called quercetin, researchers believe. Quercetin can have an impact on specific enzymes that are part of the diabetic response.

“Short-term intake of chamomile tea has beneficial effects on glycemic control and antioxidant status in patients with type 2 diabetes,” researchers concluded in the study.

The lead researchers were Maryam Zemestani, Maryam Rafraf and Mohammad Asghari-Jafarabadi. The study appeared in the August 2015 issue of Nutrition.

The results of this study were from a small sample and for a short period of time. Researchers will need to expand the study size and conduct the study for a long period to further explore this link.

Take a look at our past coverage of other potential benefits of chamomile for reduced mortality in older women and thyroid health.



Know These Beauty Benefits Of Chamomile Tea

(AsianeiIndia)

Chamomile is a herb used in traditional medicines for its calming, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It is also known for its healing properties. Both fresh flowers and dried ones are used in the preparation of chamomile tea. It is enriched with potent antioxidants such as flavonoids that are beneficial for health. This tea is very refreshing and it is a light beverage that soothes the senses and relaxes our mind.

It is an age-old medical herb used by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. This tea is gaining popularity across the globe these days for its unique health and beauty benefits. Chamomile tea has various health and beauty benefits associated with it. It can cure various ailments such as insomnia, anxiety, sore throat, irritable bowel syndrome, menstrual cramps, panic attacks, rashes, chicken pox, psoriasis and eczema.Here are some beauty benefits of chamomile tea.

Beauty benefits of chamomile tea are:

1.Cures Acne: The antioxidant property of chamomile tea fights against acne and acne scars. Chamomile tea can be taken orally or topically to combat acne. The active ingredients present in the tea can effectively remove acne and pimples from the skin.

2.Lightens Skin: Chamomile tea has skin-lightening and brightening properties. Drinking this tea can make the skin eventually fair. It is an excellent natural skin bleach. It lightens the skin tone and gives a visible glow to the skin.

3.Soothes Skin: Chamomile tea is found to be very effective in soothing skin irritation and sunburns. It can be applied topically on to the skin. Tea bags also provide a soothing effect for tired eyes. It is also a remedy for dry and flaky scalp due to its anti-fungal properties.

4.Eliminates Dark Circles: The tea bags of chamomile tea can be used to treat dark circles under the eyes. Keep chamomile tea bags under the eyes for 10 minutes and take it off. It can lighten the dark circles effectively and provide relief from puffiness of the eyes.

5.Acts As A Moisturizer : Chamomile tea works as a very good moisturizer. When consumed, it nourishes the skin, clears up acne and hydrates the skin from within. It even serves as a very good toner.

These are the beauty benefits of chamomile tea.


6 Health Benefits and Uses of Chamomile

By Sam Wylie-Harris

In the vast majority of cases, headaches are not a sign of anything serious but it’s important to see your GP if you experience severe or continuing headaches, especially if you’ve got other symptoms.

While head pain can be draining and distressing, there are lots of actions you can take to gain respite that don’t involve popping a pill (in fact, long-term painkiller use can sometimes cause chronic headaches).

Next time you’re struck with an annoying throb on the crown, try these simple lifestyle remedies.

AND BREATHE

Take some deep breaths, and try to inhale deeply from your stomach, expanding and contracting the abdomen, which clears the way for a full breathing cycle; sometimes ensuring there’s a good flow of oxygen to the brain can help relieve pain.

Taking deep breaths also helps to instantly calm you if you’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed, conditions often associated with headaches.

KEEP WELL-HYDRATED

Headaches can be caused by dehydration, so the best thing to do is take in plenty of fluids. Research suggests 16 to 32 ounces is the average amount of water needed to feel hydrated. Take small, regular sips. you should feel better in a couple of hours.

MASSAGE TECHNIQUES

Massaging the neck area and pressure points can help relieve pain. Even a little light kneading on the temples can bring relief.

Applying pressure to the ridge of the neck and walking your fingers from the shoulders up to the neck and down again can release tension from the body.

LIGHTS OUT

Taking time out, closing your eyes and lying down in a dark, quiet room for at least 20 minutes can help. Many headaches (especially migraines) can be triggered by sensory stimuli, such as bright lights.

HOT SHOWER

Taking a hot shower can bring welcome relief. The sensation of hot water flowing over the head is not only comforting, but can take your mind off the pain. Spritzing yourself with lavender water afterwards can also trigger a feeling of wellbeing.

CHAMOMILE TEA

A soothing cup of chamomile can help reduce inflammation and relieve anxiety.

Chamomile contains compounds that can ease pain and relax you. Also available in liquid extract and a skin ointment, try dabbing it on the temples.

WALK IT OFF

A fast walk in the fresh air can help clear the mind. Circulating the system and filling your lungs with air will provide your body with much-needed oxygen.

If it’s a really bad headache, wear a pair of sunglasses to block out the sunlight.


6 Health Benefits and Uses of Chamomile

By Michelle Schoffro Cook

Nearly 24 years ago I opened a health food store. Things were quite different in the field of herbalism back then. Few of my clients took any medications; today, it’s common for people to come to see me with grocery bags holding all their pharmaceutical drugs. Few people gave herbs a second thought, but now herbal medicine is increasingly being recognized as a safe and effective form of treatment. Even then, however, people understood that chamomile, a small plant with tiny flowers, was a potent natural medicine.

Ironically, while there is more research than ever showcasing chamomile’s medicinal benefits, many people seem to have forgotten this valuable herb. I hope that after you read about the exciting research and health benefits of chamomile, you will restore it to its rightful place in your home and natural medicine cabinet. Here are some of the health benefits of chamomile:

Dental Antimicrobial

Researchers assessed the antimicrobial activity of an extract of German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla or Matricaria recutita) against the fungus Candida albicans and the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis. C. albicans is the cause of a common fungal infection that is often referred to as a yeast infection while E. faecalis is an antibiotic-resistant and often life-threatening infection that sometimes inhabits root-canal-treated teeth. According to the study, a high potency extract of chamomile was highly effective at killing both of these microbes.

Mouthwash for Mouth Ulcerations

A study in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry found that a mouthwash made of German chamomile was effective at treating mouth ulcerations and the associated pain, without any side effects.


Skin Healer

Chamomile has a lengthy history of use by herbalists in the treatment of skin conditions like chicken pox rash, diaper rash, eczema and psoriasis. For these purposes it is usually added to a bath or applied to the skin as an infusion or alcohol extract. Keep in mind, however, that the alcohol extracts can be drying to the skin. Liver Protector

In a new animal study published in the medical journal General Physiology and Biophysics, researchers found that a decoction of German chamomile protected the livers of animals against the damaging effects of alcohol, suggesting the potential for liver protection for humans as well. Further research is needed, but considering that chamomile is a valuable healer with almost no side effects, it may be worth a try.

Anti-inflammatory

A study published in the Journal of Natural Products assessed the purported anti-inflammatory properties of Roman chamomile. Researchers found that it contains at least one anti-inflammatory compound and can even be beneficial in treating metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms that includes high blood sugar and cholesterol as well as abdominal fat.

Tumor Fighter

Additional research in the journal Food Chemistry found that Roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) had both antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. It also found that an infusion of chamomile had significantly greater antioxidant and anti-tumor effects than a decoction or extract.

• Using Chamomile

When using chamomile, make sure you choose the correct species for the condition you have (Roman or German, which are indicated above). Avoid using chamomile if you have an allergy to ragweed. Also, the drug warfarin negatively interacts with chamomile so it is best to avoid using both at the same time. Other blood thinners may also interact with chamomile, so it is best not to use both at the same time.

Chamomile Tea

Brew a chamomile infusion by adding one teaspoon of dried herb per cup of boiled water and let steep for at least 10 minutes. Drink one cup, 3 times daily for best results. Chamomile Extract

Follow package instructions for the tincture (alcohol extract) you choose. A typical dose is 30 drops three times daily.

Mouthwash

Use one cup of chamomile tea as a mouthwash, 2 to 3 times daily. Store the tea in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.


Does Chamomile Tea Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

By Janet Renee

With more than 1 million cups consumed each day, tea is the most common chamomile preparation, according to a review published in the November 2010 issue of the journal "Molecular Medicine Reports." If you've enjoyed chamomile tea regularly or even on occasion, you may have unknowingly benefited your blood sugar levels. Animal evidence suggests chamomile tea promotes healthy blood sugar and may lower blood sugar to protect against hyperglycemia, a condition characterized by elevated blood sugar levels. Human studies are needed for more definitive answers, however.

Chamomile Properties

There are two varieties of chamomile plants: German and Roman. German chamomile is the variety most commonly used in the United States, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Researchers have identified a wide variety of bioactive substances in chamomile, including 28 terpenoids and 36 flavonoids -- two diverse classes of plant chemicals, according to the "Molecular Medicine Reports" article. The primary flavonoids include apigenin, quercetin, patuletin, according to the article.

Promotes Stable Blood Sugar

Researchers examined the effects of chamomile tea and its major components on the blood sugar levels of rats with diabetes. They found the compound esculetin fully prevented blood sugar from rising, thus protecting against high blood sugar in a sugar-loading test. They also found that the flavonoid quercetin significantly suppressed blood sugar levels in diabetic rats that had damage to the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. While this study published in the September 2008 issue of the "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry" is promising, this doesn't mean it has the same effects in humans.

Mechanisms Behind It

The "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry" study found a couple of mechanisms by which substances in chamomile tea may prevent a rise in blood sugar. Researchers noted substances in chamomile increased liver glycogen -- a storage form of sugar. When there is excess glucose in the bloodstream, the liver can convert the glucose to glycogen to help keep levels stable. They also found chamomile extract potently inhibited enzymes involved in certain glucose metabolism pathways, which appears to help prevent glucose from accumulating in the blood.

Safety Issues

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recognizes chamomile as generally safe, according to the University of Texas, El Paso. Large amounts of chamomile tea, however, may stimulate uterine contractions if you're pregnant, according to the university. Theoretically, if you have diabetes and are currently taking blood sugar-lowering medication, chamomile tea may interact to increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or very low blood sugar.


What Is the Difference Between Roman & German Chamomile?

(San Francisco Gate)

Both Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile, formerly Anthemis nobilis) and German chamomile (Chamomilla recutita, formerly Matricaria chamomilla) are low-growing aromatic herbs cultivated for their essential oils and for use in teas, cosmetics and medicine. They have different growing habits and distributions. Roman chamomile, also known as English chamomile, is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 9. German chamomile is an annual.

Roman Chamomile

Coming from a creeping rootstock, Roman chamomile grows to 12 inches tall and has hairy stems and finely cut, threadlike, green leaves that have a scent similar to apple and pineapple. Daisy-like flowers grow 1/2 to 1 inch wide, with white petals and a yellow center. Distilled oil from Roman chamomile is clear to pale yellow. Native to the Middle East, southern and western Europe and eastern Africa, Roman chamomile is cultivated in Argentina, England, France, Belgium and the United States.

German Chamomile

German chamomile is taller, reaching 24 inches, and has hairless stems with threadlike, more sparse and less ferny leaves than Roman chamomile. The plant is less spreading. Flowers are similar but larger -- 1 to 2 inches wide. The yellow center is conical and hollow, smelling also like apple or pineapple when crushed. The essential oil is dark blue. Also known as Hungarian chamomile, the plant is cultivated in Hungary, Egypt, France and eastern Europe. Its native distribution is Europe and northern Asia.


How Long Does It Take German Chamomile to Bloom From a Seed?

(San Francisco Gate)

German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) flowers can be used in many ways including in tea or potpourri or as decoration on cakes, salads and in punch bowls. This annual is a member of the Asteraceae family that can re-seed itself and has an invasive habit. Its daisy-like blooms emit an apple scent, and after correctly starting the seeds, you can expect them to emerge about eight weeks later and continue to bloom until the frost starts.

Timing

German chamomile can be direct-sown or started indoors. To direct-sow, start the seeds in early spring or late in the summer. The seeds can germinate when exposed to temperatures as low as 45 degrees Fahrenheit and the seedlings can tolerate light frost. Because it can be difficult to keep the outdoor seeds moist to trigger germination, starting them indoors about four weeks before the last spring frost date might be preferred.

Sowing the Seeds

When sown in the garden, German chamomile prefers a sunny area with well-drained soil. Scatter the small seeds over the soil surface and lightly tamp them down with the flat side of a spade or garden hoe. Avoid covering them with soil, because they need sunlight to germinate. Indoors, start the seeds in a seed-starting tray that's filled up to a on-half inch from the top with moist seed-starting mix. Surface-sow the seeds and place the tray in a sunny window.

After Germination

Keep the growing medium moist throughout the germination period. German chamomile seeds can germinate after about one to two weeks. When the seedlings are 1 to 2 inches tall, thin them so they're at least 8 inches apart or transplant the indoor seedlings in the garden about 8 inches apart. Keep the soil free of weeds and water it regularly so the plants can establish themselves.

Harvesting

About eight weeks after starting the seeds, when the plants are in full bloom, harvest the flowers with a chamomile rake. They can be dried by spreading them on a cloth and laying them in a shady area. If you prefer to harvest the flowers with about 3 inches of the stems attached, cut them off with scissors. If you want the flowers to re-seed themselves, avoid harvesting all of them and don't mulch the soil around them. The seeds that fall on the soil will regrow.



How to Care for Chamomile Plants

(San Francisco Gate)

Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) provides a profusion of lacy, fernlike foliage and delicate white and yellow flowers, while also supplying the kitchen with an edible herb. The small daisylike flowers create a calming tea when dried and brewed and the fresh flowers add a bright garnish to salads. A perennial herb, chamomile flowers throughout summer and goes dormant during the cooler winter months. The herb thrives in Sunset's Climate Zones 2 through 24 and produces well in both dry inland regions and the moister coastal areas.

1. Plant chamomile in a well-drained garden bed that receives full sunlight. Chamomile tolerates some shade but won't flower as profusely as plants that receive full sun.

2. Mulch the bed with a 2-inch layer of bark or wood nugget mulch. The mulch retains soil moisture and prevents weed growth around the base of the plants.

3. Water chamomile once weekly. Supply 1 inch of water at each irrigation. The plants don't require irrigation if recent rainfall equals at least 1 inch and the soil still feels moist.

4. Cut back the chamomile after each flush of flowering. Trim back the entire plant by a third of its height to encourage a new flush of growth and flowers. Alternatively, pinch off individual spent flower heads to improve the appearance of the plant.

5. Harvest chamomile flowers for herbal use at any time after the blossoms bloom but before they begin to wilt. Cut off the stems above a leaf set, removing no more than a third of the plant at a single harvest.

6. Prune the entire plant back to within 2 or 3 inches of the ground after the chamomile begins to die back in late fall or early winter. Remove the clippings from the bed so they don't harbor insects or disease organisms over the winter months.

7. Apply a phosphorous-rich soluble fertilizer in spring when new growth begins. Dilute the fertilizer in water per the package-directed amounts. Water the plants with the fertilizer solution.

Things You Will Need
• Bark mulch
• Shears


◘ Tip

Purchase chamomile seedlings for transplanting in spring after the soil dries out and is no longer muddy. Alternatively, start seeds indoors in midspring, approximately six weeks before you plan to transplant.


How to Calm a Topical Allergic Reaction

By Lauren Bowen

As a girl with very sensitive skin, I know firsthand the irritations (sometimes called contact dermatitis) that can come from using subpar skincare products. Lotion and creams are designed to hydrate the skin or calm acne, but many products contain harsh fragrances and chemicals that can cause a minor allergic reaction.

Minor rashes can also show up because of extreme heat (say, in the shower or your home), viruses or bacteria, a bout of eczema, or even heavy winds!

Here’s what you need to do if your skin flares up.

Note: This remedy is for a mild topical reaction only. If your face or throat swells, or you have trouble breathing, seek medical attention immediately.

How to Calm a Topical Allergic Reaction

Most minor allergic reactions to skincare products show up on the skin as an irritated, itchy red rash. If you notice this happening to your skin, stop using the product and follow the steps below.

1) Remove All Traces of the Product

First things first, if your reaction was most likely caused by a new product, remove all traces of it on your skin. Find a very mild soap (I recommend a few drops of Castile soap) and wash with lukewarm or cool water.

If you’re reacting more strongly, massage half a teaspoon of olive oil into the skin, then gently wipe off with a moderately warm wet washcloth.

Once the product has been removed, leave your skin clean and bare. Don’t add new lotions or cosmetics; just let your skin heal for a few hours.

2) Soothe Inflammation With a Cold Compress

Pull out your handy ice pack, wrap in a cloth, then press to the skin to sooth and reduce inflammation. Don’t have an ice pack? Use a cool, damp washcloth instead. Sometimes all your body needs is a little time!

3) Seek Gentle Hydration

Once your skin has been clean for a while, consider using a very mild lotion or cream to rehydrate it. Avoid anything that has a complex list of chemical ingredients, lists “fragrance” or “parfum” on the label, or is likely to irritate your already recovering skin.

I suggest using a colloidal oatmeal lotion or pure aloe vera to be safe.

4) Try a Mild Hydrocortisone Cream

Consider using a mild hydrocortisone cream to reduce itching and inflammation from contact dermatitis. It will soothe your body’s allergic reaction to whatever substance caused the flare up. These are available over-the-counter.

Still struggling? Ask your doctor about taking an antihistamine.

Additional Tips

Many plants, flowers and herbs have anti-inflammatory, soothing properties that can heal the skin after a mild allergic reaction. If you’re still struggling to get your skin back to normal, try a few of these natural remedies!

1) Cucumber Slices

There’s a reason “cool as a cucumber” is a common saying. Cucumbers are full of vitamins and cool on the fleshy inside, making them a wonderful little remedy for a rash.

Just pull your cucumber out of the fridge, cut up a few thin slices, and place them on the affected area.

2) Chamomile Wash

Chamomile tea is a natural anti-inflammatory. The flower actually soothes discomfort and reduces pain brought on by rashes. In fact, chamomile can actual accelerate healing.

To use to soothe a rash, just place wet chamomile tea bags on the skin and wait to dry. Rinse of leftover tea or leave it on.

3) Oatmeal Facial

Oatmeal has wonderful natural healing properties that can help sooth skin irritations. Ever take an oatmeal bath during a bout of chicken pox as a kid? That’s why!

For an oatmeal bath, add a cup of uncooked oatmeal to your bath and soak. For a simple oatmeal facial, make a paste from oatmeal flour (grind in your food processor before hand) and a little bit of raw honey.


Does Chamomile Tea Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

By Janet Renee

With more than 1 million cups consumed each day, tea is the most common chamomile preparation, according to a review published in the November 2010 issue of the journal "Molecular Medicine Reports." If you've enjoyed chamomile tea regularly or even on occasion, you may have unknowingly benefited your blood sugar levels. Animal evidence suggests chamomile tea promotes healthy blood sugar and may lower blood sugar to protect against hyperglycemia, a condition characterized by elevated blood sugar levels. Human studies are needed for more definitive answers, however.

Chamomile Properties

There are two varieties of chamomile plants: German and Roman. German chamomile is the variety most commonly used in the United States, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Researchers have identified a wide variety of bioactive substances in chamomile, including 28 terpenoids and 36 flavonoids -- two diverse classes of plant chemicals, according to the "Molecular Medicine Reports" article. The primary flavonoids include apigenin, quercetin, patuletin, according to the article.

Promotes Stable Blood Sugar

Researchers examined the effects of chamomile tea and its major components on the blood sugar levels of rats with diabetes. They found the compound esculetin fully prevented blood sugar from rising, thus protecting against high blood sugar in a sugar-loading test. They also found that the flavonoid quercetin significantly suppressed blood sugar levels in diabetic rats that had damage to the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. While this study published in the September 2008 issue of the "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry" is promising, this doesn't mean it has the same effects in humans.

Mechanisms Behind It

The "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry" study found a couple of mechanisms by which substances in chamomile tea may prevent a rise in blood sugar. Researchers noted substances in chamomile increased liver glycogen -- a storage form of sugar. When there is excess glucose in the bloodstream, the liver can convert the glucose to glycogen to help keep levels stable. They also found chamomile extract potently inhibited enzymes involved in certain glucose metabolism pathways, which appears to help prevent glucose from accumulating in the blood.

Safety Issues

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recognizes chamomile as generally safe, according to the University of Texas, El Paso. Large amounts of chamomile tea, however, may stimulate uterine contractions if you're pregnant, according to the university. Theoretically, if you have diabetes and are currently taking blood sugar-lowering medication, chamomile tea may interact to increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or very low blood sugar.


How to Plant a Chamomile Lawn

(San Francisco Gate)

The tradition of herbal lawns goes back at least to the medieval period, but their ability to replace water- and resource-hogging grass lawns is relevant to today's gardener. A chamomile lawn not only withstands some foot traffic but also releases an apple fragrance with every step. The perennial Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 to 9. Chamomile lawns work best in sunny areas. Start with a small yard or even a path, because clearing, seeding and weeding a large lawn is a challenging project for a novice herbal lawn grower.

1. Remove weeds from the area in which you plan to establish a chamomile lawn. A long-handled cultivator removes most weeds, but some may require hand-pulling.

2. Lay 3 inches of compost and 1 inch of sand on top of the weeded area, and work it into the top 6 inches of soil using a spade. Rake the area smooth.

3. Broadcast chamomile seed over the surface of the raked soil at a rate of 1/2 ounce per 1,000 square feet. Sow chamomile seed in the spring, after all danger of frost has passed and when no heavy rains are expected.

4. Lightly tamp the seed into the ground with the back of the rake. This helps to hold the seed in place until it germinates and starts to take root.

5. Water the seeded lawn lightly immediately after planting. Keep the area evenly moist until seedlings appear.

6. Thin chamomile seedlings to 6 inches apart when they are about 3 inches tall. This allows each plant to develop a healthy root system as it spreads to fill in the area.

Things You Will Need
• Weeding tool
• Compost
• Sand
• Spade
• Rake
• Hose or drip irrigation system

◘ Tip

Remove some of the lawn's flowers once the chamomile blooms to increase foliage vigor. It's not necessary to remove all of the flowers, which add color and scent to the lawn. Some traditionalists insist using on the nonflowering cultivar "Treneague" (Chamaemelum nobile "Treneague"), a classic of the English countryside that is perennial in USDA zone 8, for a lawn. "Treneague" grows lower to the ground than common Roman chamomile, forming a more lawnlike mat. Unfortunately, this English chamomile does not grow from seed, making it expensive to plant more than a small area from nursery-purchased transplants. If you use "Treneague" transplants, set them 12 inches apart to make the project more economical. The area will eventually fill in as thickly as a seeded Roman chamomile lawn. You won't have to mow your chamomile lawn, but do keep it well weeded, especially before it has a chance to become established and crowd out other vegetation.

◘ Warning

Although chamomile lawns withstand normal foot traffic once established, young lawns are delicate. Avoid walking over the area until the leaves of individual seedlings begin to touch one another. If the area receives a great deal of use, consider adding paving stones to your lawn before seeding it to avoid too much wear and tear.



3 ways chamomile can help fight anxiety and depression

By Poorva Chavan
Feeling blue? Try chamomile to soothe your senses!

What do you when you are feeling low, stressed or depressed? Snack on your favourite comfort food? And this comfort food is mostly a pizza loaded with cheese or a packet of chips? You know it is unhealthy and will simply pile up on your hips! Instead try a healthier way of beating the blues – chamomile.

Benefits of chamomile

Chamomile is a medicinal herb widely used in alternative medicine for treating a variety of disorders like inflammation, muscle spasms and menstrual disorders and a has a variety of other health benefits too. But it also uplifts your mood, help you fight anxiety and relax you [1]. The chamomile herb has bioactive compounds which are used in various medicinal preparations and cosmetics too. However, it’s exact mode of action to treat anxiety and general depression is unknown, researchers speculate that the flavonoid content in chamomile stimulate the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine, noradrenalin, serotonin and Gama Amino Butyric Acid (GABA) which have a calming effect and help you tackle anxiety and depression [2].

How to use it

1. Chamomile tea is easily available in the market. You can dip a tea bag in hot water for a few minutes and sip the tea when you are feeling depressed or anxious. Here are 6 amazing benefits of chamomile tea for your health. 2. You can also add a few drops of chamomile essential oil in your bath water. If you are wrung out at the end of a day, a warm chamomile water bath is all you need to lift your mood and relax. Alternatively, you can dab a few drops of chamomile oil on your pulse points after a bath. The lingering scent will help you stay calm all day long. 3. You can also make your room smell like chamomile by diffusing it in the air with an electronic or a manual diffuser. The fragrance will help you relax and sleep better.


Benefits of chamomile tea

(TNN)

Of late, green tea has earned kudos for its miraculous effects on skin and body. But the wonders of chamomile tea are still unknown to many. Yes, chamomile tea has sundry beneficial effects on the skin as well as hair. Some of them are as follows:

1. It has an abundance of amazing healing, antioxidant, cleansing and moisturizing properties and is considered a full-fledged skincare treatment.

2. Infused with great healing properties, chamomile tea accelerates the healing process of minor wounds and also disinfects the wounds.

3. Chamomile tea is an excellent all-natural skin bleach. It lightens the complexion and renders it a healthy glow.

4. It is found to be very effective in soothing skin irritation and sunburns.

5. This magic potion is a powerhouse of antioxidants that help you fight acne and breakouts. It also works wonders to eliminate acne scars.

6. It protects your skin from free radical damage, a chief contributor to premature aging, hence help retaining your youthful charm for long.

7. Placing cooled down chamomile tea bags under the eyes can help reducing under-eye dark circles and eye puffiness. It also soothes your tired eyes.

8. When blended with powdered milk, chamomile tea provides you a great body and facial scrub. It sloughs off the dead, dry skin cells revealing the underlying cells which are new.

9. If consumed on a regular basis, chamomile tea nourishes and moisturizes your skin from deep inside. You may also want to use chamomile in your homemade beauty recipes to draw its beauty benefits.

10. A chamomile tea rinse brightens up the blonde hair instantly. If combined with henna, it makes natural highlights for dark hair as well.

11. It is a wonderful hair lightener. Using chamomile tea as final hair rinse adds a stunning bright-golden light to the brown hair. Use the treatment regularly to lighten your hair gradually.

12. Chamomile is also found to be highly effectual in preventing and eliminating dandruff. In addition, it also soothes irritated scalp.


An introduction to chamomile

By Veronica Hankey (The Manila Times)

The flowers and leaves of the chamomile plant contain essential oils, chamazulene, coumarin, heterosides and flavonics (common chamomile), camphor, borneol, erpenes, esters and a bitter substance (wild chamomile), and azulene, which is anti-allergic.

Common chamomile (Anthemis nobilis) is in general use today, owing its popularity to the value of its infusions and essential oil. The latter, obtained by steam distillation from the flowers, is anti-spasmodic, antiphlogistic, anti-ophthalmic, aperitive, febrifugal, stimulative, digestive, emmenagogic and vermifugal.

There are numerous testimonies about relief being obtained for gout, rheumatic pains, boils, dermatitis, eczema, herpes and conjunctivitis from chamomile.

The easiest way of taking oils internally is to put one teaspoon of honey into a glass or cup and add approximately 30 ml (1 oz) of warm water, stirring until the honey is dissolved. Adding just a drop or two of chamomile essential oil, stirring again and taking this mixture in teaspoonful amounts, is a pleasant way to seek relief of anemia, loss of appetite, congestion of the liver or spleen, convulsions, depression, slow digestion, fever, influenza, insomnia, facial neuralgia, and stomach cramps.

There are also several interesting ways to use chamomile essential oil as an environment friendly air freshener. Simply add a few drops of chamomile essence to a bowl of hot water. The air will be filled with its lovely clean fragrance and everyone will become more relaxed and serene. Once the water has cooled and has not been allowed to become contaminated, it can be transferred to a commercial spray bottle and the contents sprayed on freshly laundered towels and bed linen. I even spray some into the clothes cupboards from time to time. It gives everyone that little bit of help to combat the stresses and strains of daily living.

To help your body cope after a hectic day, add a few drops of chamomile essential oil to a bowl of warm water. Soak a face cloth in the water and gently wring out the excess. Take some time to relax and unwind with the compress over the eyes and forehead. Alternatively, you might want to experiment with a steam vapor inhalation to which you have added a few drops of chamomile oil. Simply cover your head with a towel while bending over the bowl, and breathe in the wonderful aroma of nature.

The novice can experiment by adding a few drops of chamomile essential oil to normal temperature bath water. Lightly agitate the water before lying back and soaking up the goodness of this amazing oil.

Alternatively, you could just wash your face in a chamomile infusion of the herbs. Herbal teas are known to be excellent for the skin. Chamomile is a wonderfully soothing tea. Pour some boiling water over a heaped spoon of dried leaves and flowers. Tea bags can also be used if you are assured that the quality is good. Allow to infuse for a few minutes. Add some honey if desired. This drink is ideal after a really busy day and will soothe and relax you.

Always remember that essential oils are very concentrated and thus very powerful. Just because you find that a little is beneficial, don’t assume that a large amount would work better. Externally, a too strong mixture can cause irritation to the skin.


9 Herbal Oils That Work Like A Charm On Itchy Scalp!

By Rima Chowdhury

To treat the problem of itchy scalp, we've listed a few herbal oils that can treat the problem quite effectively, and that too naturally! Read here to know more about them.

Itchy scalp relates to a condition of the scalp where you keep scratching at it quite often. Itchy scalp can lead to embarrassing situations various times, as a person can keep scratching his head even in public. Not to worry, we have listed a few herbal oils here that can naturally treat the problem of itchy scalp. Environmental pollution, mental stress and irregular diet may be some of the factors that can lead to the problem of itchy scalp. Itchy scalp is quite a problem for people who travel a lot and for those who sweat as well.

So, if you're experience itching of the scalp quite often, here are some of the essential oils that can work like a charm. These oils contain anti-inflammatory properties in them, which can treat the root cause of the problem of itchy scalp. Here are the herbal oils for itchy scalp:

1.Chamomile Oil Chamomile oil is an effective essential oil, which should be used to relieve itching of the scalp. In order to prevent frequent itching on the scalp, chamomile oil should be applied on the scalp. Warm some chamomile oil and give a good head massage. Now, wrap your head with a warm towel and leave it overnight. Wash off with a mild shampoo, the next day. Chamomile oil contains antibiotic, antiseptic and antispasmodic properties that help treat the condition.

2. Lavender Oil Lavender oil is an essential oil and is one of the top aromatherapy oils that should be used for treating itchy scalp. Using lavender oil not only helps to treat itching on the scalp but it also helps to improve blood circulation on the scalp, thus boosting hair growth. Take some lavender oil and mix with coconut oil and then apply it on your scalp.

3. Rosemary Oil Many people use rosemary oil to prevent baldness and greying of hair. One among the hidden benefits of using rosemary oil on scalp is that it helps to relieve itching on scalp. Rosemary oil has proved its efficiency in treating dandruff and dry scalp, apart from being used to relieve itching. Take a few drops of rosemary oil and heat it for some time. When the oil is still hot, massage your scalp with this.

4. Patchouli Oil Patchouli oil is one among the traditional oils used in China, Japan, and Malaysia. It helps to deal with dry and chapped skin, dry scalp and many other skin and hair problems. Due to its antimicrobial properties, patchouli oil can also be used to treat dry hair. Take a few drops of patchouli oil and mix it with coconut oil. Now, apply this mixture on your scalp and wait for a few hours. Wash off with lukewarm water. Shampoo the next day.

5. Coconut Oil Coconut oil is one of the best oils that helps to deal with an itchy scalp. Due to anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties present in coconut oil, it helps to relieve itchy scalp. Take some warm coconut oil and massage it on your scalp. Allow the oil to set in the scalp and leave it overnight. Wash off with lukewarm water the next day.

6. Lemon Oil Lemon oil contains antifungal and antimicrobial properties, which not only help to treat itchy scalp but also soothe the scalp. Continuous use of lemon oil helps to relieve scratching and itching further leading to relaxation. This citrus oil helps to boost hair growth and also treats scalp problem. Massage your oil with some warm lemon oil and wash it off with lukewarm water. Repeat doing this for at least thrice in a week.

7. Geranium Oil This floral oil helps to boost the pH value of the scalp, thus aiding in the treatment of itchy scalp. Geranium oil is widely used as an aromatherapy oil due to its innumerable benefits. Due to its astringent properties, geranium oil can be used on hair and scalp. Take some baking soda and add some geranium oil to it. Make a thick paste and apply it on your scalp. Wait for sometime and wash off with lukewarm water.

8. Peppermint Oil Due to its antimicrobial properties, peppermint oil is known as the most versatile essential oil in the world. Along with its minty fragrance, peppermint oil also aids in a range of therapeutic benefits. It has been known for its medicinal properties since ages. In order to get rid of parched and dry scalp, use peppermint oil on a daily basis.

9. Orange Oil Just like how orange tea is extremely beneficial, orange oil is a great aid herbal oil to treat itchy scalp as well. Take some warm sweet orange oil and apply it directly on the scalp. Now, cover your scalp with a towel and wait for sometime. After 1-2 hours, wash off with lukewarm water.


Chamomile tea and gargle with salt water: Seven natural cures for tonsillitis

By Olivia Lerche

TONSILLITIS is an inflammation of the tonsils, usually caused by a viral infection or less commonly, a bacterial infection.

Symptoms of the condition include a sore throat and pain when swallowing, a high temperature, coughing, swollen lymph nodes in the neck and a headache.

The condition isn’t usually serious but it can be painful and uncomfortable for sufferers - and in severe cases can prevent people eating or even breathing properly.

Antibiotics are only prescribed if a bacterial infection is the cause of the illness.

Nat Hawes, author of Nature Cures, said: “Tonsillitis is a condition that tends to resolve itself without the need for medical intervention. In most cases the tonsils will get better with self-care and home remedies and do not require any emergency treatment.”

However, she warned: “Acute an recurring tonsillitis may not respond well to home remedies and may require more drastic measures such as a tonsillectomy.” The nutritionist recommended five home remedies to ease the symptoms of tonsillitis.

Lime: The citrus fruit is one of the most popular natural remedies for tonsillitis. Mix fresh lime juice in warm water with honey and salt and sip on this combination for pain relief from swollen tonsils.

Fenugreek seeds: Boil fenugreek seeds in water for half an hour. Cool and strain and use this water to gargle with. Fenugreek has anti-bacterial properties that make it excellent for tonsillitis.

Milk: Boil milk and add a pinch of tumeric and powdered black pepper powder. Drink this concoction before sleeping for a minimum of three nights in a row as an effective remedy for inflamed tonsils. Goats’ milk is easier to digest for those that are lactose intolerant.

Chamomile tea: Chamomile tea mixed with lemon and honey is an age-old natural remedy for tonsillitis. The chamomile acts as a relaxant and reduces stress and anxiety caused by tonsillitis, along with addressing the symptoms of the condition, such as pain and soreness.

Salt water: Salt-water gargle helps to ease throat pain and reduce swelling. Salt water help in cleaning out the mouth and throat and prevents the build-up of further infection on the surface of the tonsils.

Beetroot: Drink freshly juiced beetroot, carrot and or cucumber juice daily to boost the body’s immune system and fight the infection more efficiently. Drink these juices individually or mix them together for the best results.

Herbs: Calendular, cleavers and mullein are three powerful herbs that can stimulate and cleanse congestion and mucus from the lymph system, and relieve the symptoms of tonsillitis and other related swellings of the throat, neck, arms and groin.

To make a tea, use two parts calendula, two parts cleavers and one part mullein. Place the herbs in a small saucepan and cover with cold water.

Heat slowly and simmer, covered, for 20 to 45 minutes. The longer the herbs are simmered, the stronger the tea will be.

Drink two to three cups a day.


5 Remarkable Skincare Benefits of Chamomile

By Elise Moreau

For centuries, people have been using chamomile as a natural remedy to relieve conditions like upset stomachs, insomnia, cramps, chest cold irritation and all sorts of other common ailments. Because of its powerful therapeutic properties, the daisy-like flower is a popular choice for keeping skin healthy, too.

Here are just a few reasons why you may want to start incorporating chamomile into your own skincare routine if you haven’t already.

1. Its anti-inflammatory properties can help with acne, eczema, psoriasis, sunburns, rashes and other skin irritations.

Historically, people have used chamomile to treat a variety of common skin problems, and today, people still use it in creams and ointments to apply topically to the affected area for both healing and relief. Research has shown that the herb has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-fungal properties, suggesting that the essential oils and flavonoids are powerful enough to reach deeper levels of the skin below the surface.

2. It speeds up the healing process in wounds and abscesses.

According to the same scientific publication mentioned in the previous point, chamomile can be effectively used to dry open wounds and help them heal faster. In a group of people who used chamomile to treat their wounds, a 61 percent reduction in wound area was experienced compared to a 48 percent reduction in people who skipped the chamomile treatment.

3. It can be used as an effective moisturizer and slow down the aging process of the skin.

Aging skin is something everyone deals with as they get older, but chamomile has been shown to slow down the process in a way that may keep you looking younger for longer. Chamomile contains levomenol, which is an agent that has anti-inflammatory and natural moisturizing properties proven to reduce the effects of photodamage while at the same time soothing itchiness, improving skin texture and prolonging elasticity.

4. It may help get rid of dark under eye circles and puffiness.

A popular beauty trend involves placing cool teabags on the eyes for a few minutes, which may, people claim, help to treat unsightly dark circles and visible tiredness. Since chamomile can be found in teas sold almost anywhere, it’s a perfect choice for this simple little home remedy. Some people swear by black tea or green tea for the caffeine in it, but the powerful anti-inflammatory properties found in chamomile tea may provide an additional special benefit.

5. It may lighten your complexion for a healthy glow.

Although there isn’t any scientific proof of it, lots of people claim that chamomile acts as a natural skin bleacher. Given its cleansing and moisturizing properties along with the powerful antioxidants and anti-aging effects it has to offer, perhaps there may be some merit to this claim. You’d have to try it to see for yourself!

You can get chamomile in dried herb form, as an herbal tea, in creams and ointments or as an essential oil. Use caution if you plan on consuming chamomile or applying it topically to your skin since some people experience allergic reactions when they use herbs or oils.

Try just a small test amount on your skin first, and of course, talk to your doctor if you’re just not sure!


The multiple benefits of drinking chamomile tea

By Dusan Lucic

Chamomile tea has enjoyed a reputation of being an all-curing remedy for centuries and even today it is perhaps the most common tea around the world.

It's not hard to see how chamomile tea got its reputation—it will help you with your stomach problems, it will help you with your headache and it will help you with insomnia.

Scientists have recently concluded that chamomile also contains multiple anti-inflammatory components that will relieve all kinds of skin conditions, ranging from acne breakout to eczema and psoriasis.

As mentioned earlier, chamomile tea will be very helpful if you have sleeping problems. It has a mild sedative effect on your body and will put you to sleep in a matter of minutes.

Insomnia usually goes hand in hand with anxiety and depression, but you need not worry—even if chamomile fails to cure your insomnia, its soothing effect is enough to help you relax and forget about your worries for a while.

Chamomile has also been proven to be very useful when dealing with severe burns, scrapes and other similar superficial injuries. However, even though putting tea bags on your injuries can help, it is recommended to get chamomile oil and rub it gently over the injured areas.

As with all other herbal teas, it is important to use chamomile tea moderately. Although most of the side effects are not very threatening—drowsiness and vomiting, two of the most common side effects, are merely unwelcome inconveniences.

However, having said that, high doses of chamomile tea can be very harmful during pregnancy, as they can even lead to a spontaneous abortion.


Is chamomile tea the secret to a long life? Herbal brew can slash the risk of an early death

By Madlen Davies for MailOnline
• The tea was linked with 29% lower risk of early death from all causes
• But the results were only seen in women over 65 - and not in men
• Researchers say it is not clear why tea prolongs women's lives
• Studies show chamomile can help treat anxiety and diabetic complications

The data showed that consuming chamomile was associated with a 29 per cent decreased risk of early death from all causes among women, compared with those who did not drink the tea.

The link was still present even after the researchers adjusted for demographics, health conditions and health behaviours.

Curiously, this effect was not present in men.

Dr Bret Howrey, an assistant professor at The University of Texas Medical Branch, said: 'The reason for a difference in our reported findings between Hispanic women and men is not clear, although women were shown to be more frequent users of chamomile than men.'

'This difference may be due to traditional gender roles whereby women manage the day-to-day activities of the household, including family health, and may also reflect greater reliance on folk remedies such as herbs.'

He added it is unclear how chamomile is associated with lower death rates.

However recent studies of the herb have shown potential benefits in treating high blood sugar, upset stomachs, diabetic complications and anxiety disorders.

Chamomile has also been touted for its cholesterol-lowering, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet effects.

The exact pathway for the reduction in mortality represents an important area for future research, Dr Howrey said.

The findings were published online in The Gerontologist journal.


Chamomile tea helps women live longer

By Yoliswa Hlatshwayo

Chamomile tea has been around for centuries. It is used widely around the world and it is recommended for various medical conditions.

According to a new study published in The Gerontologist journal, chamomile tea may help women live longer.

The study found that those who drank the soothing tea regularly had a 29% lower risk of early death from all causes. For this study, the researchers wanted to find out if chamomile tea could prolong the lives of both women and men. They tracked 1,677 Mexican-American women and men for a period of seven years, observing the effects of chamomile tea on death. The researchers used data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, a study that looked at Mexican-Americans aged 65 and older from five southwestern states. What the researchers is that of all people in the study, 14% drank chamomile tea on a regular basis. They also found that women who were regular chamomile tea drinkers had a 29% reduced risk of early death from all causes. Even after researchers adjusted their findings for health conditions and demographics, results stayed the same. However, they found that the same results weren’t present in men.

Researchers are unsure why only women reap live-longer benefits from chamomile tea

According to Dr Bret Howrey , an assistant professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch, the reason for a difference in the findings between Hispanic women and men isn’t clear. However, he suggested that it may be because women showed to be more frequent consumers of chamomile tea than men. Dr Howrey also suggested that the difference may be due to traditional gender roles whereby women manage household activities like family, and therefore may also reflect more reliance on folk remedies like herbs such as chamomile. One thing that the research team is still unclear on, however, is what gives chamomile tea its longevity properties. Chamomile tea has been touted in the past for its antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and cholesterol-lowering effects, but never for its ability to low death rates up until now.


Beauty Benefits Of Chamomile Tea

(Bindu, Boldsky)

Chamomile is a herb used in traditional medicines for its calming, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It is also known for its healing properties. Both fresh flowers and dried ones are used in the preparation of chamomile tea. It is enriched with potent antioxidants such as flavonoids that are beneficial for health. This tea is very refreshing and it is a light beverage that soothes the senses and relaxes our mind.

It is an age-old medical herb used by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. This tea is gaining popularity across the globe these days for its unique health and beauty benefits. Chamomile tea has various health and beauty benefits associated with it. It can cure various ailments such as insomnia, anxiety, sore throat, irritable bowel syndrome, menstrual cramps, panic attacks, rashes, chicken pox, psoriasis and eczema.

In this article, we at Boldsky are listing out some of the beauty benefits of chamomile tea. Read on to know more about it.

Cures Acne: The antioxidant property of chamomile tea fights against acne and acne scars. Chamomile tea can be taken orally or topically to combat acne. The active ingredients present in the tea can effectively remove acne and pimples from the skin.

Lightens Skin: Chamomile tea has skin-lightening and brightening properties. Drinking this tea can make the skin eventually fair. It is an excellent natural skin bleach. It lightens the skin tone and gives a visible glow to the skin.

Soothes Skin: Chamomile tea is found to be very effective in soothing skin irritation and sunburns. It can be applied topically on to the skin. Tea bags also provide a soothing effect for tired eyes. It is also a remedy for dry and flaky scalp due to its anti-fungal properties. Eliminates Dark Circles: The tea bags of chamomile tea can be used to treat dark circles under the eyes. Keep chamomile tea bags under the eyes for 10 minutes and take it off. It can lighten the dark circles effectively and provide relief from puffiness of the eyes. Acts As A Moisturiser : Chamomile tea works as a very good moisturiser. When consumed, it nourishes the skin, clears up acne and hydrates the skin from within. It even serves as a very good toner.


The hidden benefits of chamomile tea

By Shilpi Guha (TNN)

Of late, green tea has earned a worldwide fan following for its miraculous effects on skin and body. But the wonders of chamomile tea are still unknown to many.

Yes, chamomile tea has beneficial effects on the skin.Some of them are as follows: It has amazing healing, anti-oxidant, cleansing and moisturizing properties and is considered a complete skincare treatment.

Infused with great healing properties, chamomile tea accelerates the healing process of minor wounds and also disinfects them.

Chamomile tea is an excellent natural skin bleach. It lightens the complexion and renders it a healthy glow .

It is found to be very effective in soothing skin irritations and sunburns.

This magic potion is a powerhouse of antioxidants that help you in fighting acne and breakouts.It also works wonders in eliminating acne scars.

It protects your skin from free radical damage that is a chief contributor to premature aging, hence help retaining the youthful charm for long.

Placing cooled-down chamomile tea bags under the eyes can help in reducing under-eye dark circles and eye puffiness.

When mixed with powdered milk, chamomile tea provides you a great body and facial scrub. It clears off the dead and dry skin cells revealing the underlying cells which are new.


4 Health benefits of chamomile

By Margaret Badore

Chamomile is one of the oldest and most popular medicinal herbs, but it has also become one of the best studied by modern medicine. According to one medical paper, more than one million cups of camomile tea are consumed per day around the world. For good reason, as this little white flower can have some big benefits for your health.

There are two types of chamomile typically used for medicinal purposes, German Chamomile (Chamomilla recutita) and Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). There's a very low risk of side effects to using chamomile as a tea or extract, however some people can be allergic to its pollen. People who suffer from ragweed allergies should be cautious.

1. Fall asleep faster

Chamomile tea and and essential oil aromatherapy are widely used to help induce sleep. Yet the effectiveness of chamomile as a sleep aide hasn’t been subjected to much clinical study. However on a chemical level, chamomile extracts have been shown to have sedative properties. So, go ahead and take your grandmother’s advice and have a cup of this herbal tea before bed.

2. Sooth common cold symptoms

We can’t say that chamomile is a cure for the common cold, but it can reduce suffering from its symptoms. Preliminary studies show that inhaling steam containing chamomile extract soothes the discomfort caused by an upper respiratory infection. Chamomile contains anti-inflammatory compounds, which may explain these benefits.

3. Reduce stress

Chamomile contains apigenin, a compound that has anti-anxiety effects. One study found that patients suffering from generalized anxiety disorder showed moderate benefits from taking camomile extract capsules when compared to a placebo.

4. Boost the immune system

A small study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that drinking chamomile tea boosts antibacterial compounds in the body. The researchers think this could explain why regular consumption of chamomile seems to fight colds, although more study would be needed to establish a definitive link.

Other traditional uses for chamomile are treating upset stomach, easing cramps, and as a topical ointment for wounds, eczema and chickenpox. However, its usefulness for these conditions have been studied less.


The Health Benefits of Chamomile Tea

By Tracey Roizman, D.C. (Demand Media)

Chamomile, a plant with a diminutive, daisy-like flower and apple scent, has been used since ancient times; by the Egyptians as a fever-reducer and by the Greeks and as an ulcer cure by the Egyptians. Nowadays mostly used as a soothing herbal tea, modern science has identified numerous potential health benefits of chamomile.

Anti-Inflammatory

Chamomile tea may offer similar anti-inflammatory benefits to some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, according to a cell culture study published in the November 2009 issue of the journal "Life Science." Chamomile inhibited release of inflammatory prostaglandin molecules from white blood cells in a manner similar to that of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2, or COX-2, one of the inflammatory enzymes targeted by NSAIDS. Researchers concluded that drinking chamomile tea may help prevent inflammatory conditions. In a study published in the September 2011 issue of the journal "Medicina Oral, Patologia Oral, y Cirugia Bucal," chamomile helped heal mouth sores in laboratory animals. Chamomile decreased inflammation, promoted regrowth of tissue around the wounds and increased production of collagen protein.

Anxiety and Depression

Herbalists recommend drinking 1 to 3 cups per day of chamomile tea as a remedy for anxiety and depression, according to CoxHealth. A study published in the September 2012 issue of the journal "Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine" found that chamomile supplementation successfully alleviated depression. In the study, participants who took standardized supplements containing 220 milligrams of chamomile extract showed significant improvements in mood as measured on a depression rating scale. Chamomile relieved symptoms of anxiety in a study published in the August 2009 issue of the "Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology." Participants took chamomile extract daily for eight weeks. Results showed up to 50 percent reduction in anxiety symptoms. Researchers concluded that chamomile may be useful for management of mild to moderate anxiety disorders.

Digestive Health

Chamomile is used in herbal medicine to treat a variety of digestive conditions, including irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea and colic, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. A study published in the 2006 issue of the journal "Arzneimittel Forschung" found that a combination of chamomile and apple pectin significantly decreased the duration of diarrhea in children aged 6 months to 6 years.

Cancer Prevention

An herbal combination consisting of ginseng, cranberry, green tea, grape skin and seed, reishi mushroom and chamomile inhibited an aggressive form of prostate cancer in a laboratory animal study published in the October 2009 issue of the journal "Anticancer Research." Each of the herbs has been shown to have anticancer benefits individually, note researchers. Together they showed significant inhibition of tumor growth and invasion of surrounding tissues. The combination was also safe, with few adverse side effects. Apigenin, one of the active constituents in chamomile, may help prevent some forms of gastrointestinal cancer, according to a study published in the November 2012 issue of the journal "Molecular Nutrition and Food Research." Apigenin, which is formed in the digestive tract from an inactive precursor, inhibits cancer cell growth and blood supply to cancerous tumors.


Is chamomile tea the secret to a long life? Herbal brew can slash the risk of an early death

By Madlen Davies for MailOnline
• The tea was linked with 29% lower risk of early death from all causes
• But the results were only seen in women over 65 - and not in men
• Researchers say it is not clear why tea prolongs women's lives
• Studies show chamomile can help treat anxiety and diabetic complications

Chamomile tea may help women live longer, according to new research.

Drinking the herbal brew was linked with a 29 per cent lower risk of early death from all causes.

But it's bad news for men, as positive effects were not replicated.

Researchers say it's not clear why the tea prolongs women's lives, or why it only works for one gender.

Chamomile is one of the oldest, most-widely used and well-documented medicinal plants in the world and has been recommended for a variety of afflictions.

As part of the study, US researchers tracked 1,677 Mexican-American women and men for seven years, and looked at the effects of chamomile tea on death.

They took data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, a study of Mexican-Americans aged 65 and older from five Southwestern states, including Texas.

They found 14 per cent of the people in the study drank chamomile tea.

The data showed that consuming chamomile was associated with a 29 per cent decreased risk of early death from all causes among women, compared with those who did not drink the tea.

The link was still present even after the researchers adjusted for demographics, health conditions and health behaviours.

Curiously, this effect was not present in men.

Dr Bret Howrey, an assistant professor at The University of Texas Medical Branch, said: 'The reason for a difference in our reported findings between Hispanic women and men is not clear, although women were shown to be more frequent users of chamomile than men.'

'This difference may be due to traditional gender roles whereby women manage the day-to-day activities of the household, including family health, and may also reflect greater reliance on folk remedies such as herbs.'

He added it is unclear how chamomile is associated with lower death rates.

However recent studies of the herb have shown potential benefits in treating high blood sugar, upset stomachs, diabetic complications and anxiety disorders.

Chamomile has also been touted for its cholesterol-lowering, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet effects.

The exact pathway for the reduction in mortality represents an important area for future research, Dr Howrey said.

The findings were published online in The Gerontologist journal.


Chamomile – The Unsung Hero of Teas

Dr. James Rouse (KUSA)

DENVER, CO - Optimum Wellness Presented by King Soopers

When we think of the healing power of tea we often turn to green tea, white tea or even black tea as the superheroes. There is an unsung hero among popular teas and it has to do with the little white and yellow daisy-like flower called chamomile. As gentle and dainty as the flower appears, don’t be fooled – chamomile is a powerhouse when it comes to healing properties. Chamomile has been used medicinally worldwide for centuries. With a known calming quality it is popular to drink chamomile tea after dinner and it is also used as gentle sedative during stressful times and to induce a state of calm. Newer research suggests that the healing powers of chamomile may also include prevention of certain cancers including thyroid cancer and prostate cancer. Drinking chamomile tea is also associated with an overall decreased risk of death from all causes in Hispanic American women over age 65.

Chamomile’s healing properties are well documented. It has anti-inflammatory and other healing properties. It can be placed in a vaporizer and inhaled for respiratory tract support and inflammation. Recent data on chamomile tea consumption in Hispanic women over 65 years old showed an overall 29% decreased risk of death from all causes compared to non chamomile tea drinkers. That is quite significant and unfortunately this effect was not demonstrated in men.

However, flavonoids (plant compounds) found in fruits and vegetables and chamomile, have been associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer in men. And new research further supports the regularly consumption of chamomile tea as it may help to keep the thyroid gland healthy and reduce the risk of thyroid cancer (in men and women). In this study out of Greece, chamomile tea drinkers (two to six times per week) were on average 70% less likely to develop defects in their thyroid. And if you continue your chamomile tea habit for 30 years or more, the percentage goes up to 80% reduced risk of thyroid problems.

Chamomile tea may help ease indigestion and gas, so it makes for a pleasant after dinner tea.

Anyone allergic to plants in the ragweed family will want to avoid chamomile. Also, anyone on warfarin (Coumadin) or cyclosporine should avoid chamomile due to possible interactions. Talk to your doctor before using chamomile medicinally.


Chamomile tea works great as a natural remedy against blemishes and breakouts

By Katarzyna Sadej (Boston Natural Beauty Examiner)

When it comes to the occasional blemish or breakout, many of us are quick to run to the nearest drugstore to purchase chemical-laden face washes that actually do more harm than good. But there is an ancient natural remedy that most people are not aware of, that most of us can find in our kitchens, and that is readily available in every grocery store's tea section!

Chamomile, used as an anti-inflammation and anti-fever herb since ancient Egyptian and ancient Greek times, is made into a pleasant tea beverage when the dried flowers of the chamomile plant are infused in hot water. Based on numerous studies about the consumption of chamomile tea, there are amazing benefits for the insides of our bodies, including reduction in cancer risk and reduction in thyroid issues.

Chamomile tea is also very effective as an anti-inflammatory and calming remedy when rubbed onto our skin. For many people, simply rubbing chamomile on a blemish or breakout will reduce the redness and the severity of the breakout. Working both as a healing agent and as a anti-inflammatory, chamomile will help battle acne naturally! Many chemically-laden acne washes will actually worsen redness in a breakout because of the harsh ingredients, that we would never want to ingest.

With chamomile tea, one may prepare a cup and drink it for all of the internal benefit of ingesting chamomile; and then, one may actually use the tea bag itself , instead of using a "cotton pad", to apply the soaked up chamomile liquid to the problem areas on the face or body. One or two gentle swipes is enough to let the skin absorb the healing benefits of chamomile tea. For best results, keep some chamomile tea in a jar (but be sure to drink it before the day is out as tea does go bad), and apply the tea to problem skin areas in the morning, at mid-day, and at night.

So, give chamomile tea a try next time you experience a blemish, and see if this natural remedy works for you!


9 Amazing Health Benefits of Chamomile Tea

By Christina Sarich

Chamomile, meaning ‘ground apple,’ has been imbibed for centuries in the Roman Empire, during Egyptian rule, and in ancient Greece. Prized for its special flavanoids, chrysin, chamomile (Matricaria recutita, or Matricaria chamomilla) offers numerous health-boosting benefits. Here are 9 amazing health benefits of chamomile tea that every foodie should know about.

• 1. Treats Cuts and Wounds – Chamomile tea was used by the Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians as a salve for wounds to expedite healing. In a recent study, rats given chamomile flavored water healed faster than those who were not given the elixir. It worked especially well for burn wounds. This is because Matricaria chamomilla has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects.
• 2. Helps with Diabetes – Some research has shown that chamomile can help those suffering from diabetes. It also helps with hyperglycemia.
• 3. Antibacterial – The antibacterial effects of drinking chamomile tea can help to prevent and treat colds while protecting against bacterial-related illness and infection.
• 4. Calms Muscle Spasms – One study from England found that drinking chamomile tea raised urine levels of glycine, a compound that calms muscle spasms. Researchers believe this is why chamomile tea could prove to be an effective home remedy for menstrual cramps as well.
• 5. Soothes Stomach Ache – Further adding onto chamomile benefits, the herb is a wonderful for soothing an upset stomach. Helping to soothe and relaxe the muscles and lining of the intestines, chamomile can help with poor digestion and even those suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
• 6. Promotes Sleep – Drinking chamomile tea soothes the nervous system so that you can sleep better. It has been used as a solution for insomnia for centuries.
• 7. Natural Hemorrhoid Treatment – Chamomile ointment can help to relieve hemorrhoids.
• 8. Fights Cancer – It’s very likely that chamomile tea can help reduce cancerous cells, although research is still ongoing to see exactly how chamomile reverses abnormal cellular growth.
• 9. Promotes Healthy Skin – With it’s anti-inflammatory and anti-septic properties, chamomile helps in clearing up skin irritations such as eczema, acne, and allergies.

Chamomile is known as a ‘tisane’ is any non-caffeinated herbal concoction made by pouring hot water over the leaves, stems, and roots of plants. You can make your own chamomile tea with other plants like lavender or tulsi to vary the flavor, or drink it alone.

There are many applications for dried chamomile including tinctures and essential oils though the easiest and most often used is an infusion or tea. For stomach ailments, muscle spasms, and help in falling asleep, use about one tablespoon of dried herb per cup of water. Pour boiling water over the herbs and allow to steep for about 5 minutes. Strain and enjoy.


Sipping Chamomile Tea Helps Women Live Longer, Lowers Mortality Risk By 29%

By Lizette Borreli

In the search for the fountain of youth, our culture has become obsessed with anti-aging supplements and fad diets touted for boosting longevity. However, the secret to a long and healthy life has been around for thousands of years in an herbal brew. According a recent study published in the journal The Gerontologist, drinking chamomile tea decreases all-cause mortality in older women.

In the U.S., herbal and supplement use has been increasing in the past 10 to 15 years. In 2002, the National Health Interview Survey, reported 20 percent of the U.S. population had used some type of herb or supplement during the 12 months prior, with h

Photo Gallery of Chamomile flowers land plants